Black-and-White Warbler

Black and white warbler

A perky little warbler of mixed woodlands that migrates through Tidewater Virginia. A few remain here to breed. It creeps along branches and up and down tree trunks looking for insects in the same manner as nuthatches and creepers. A friend of trees, it eats gypsy moth caterpillars and bark beetles.

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Ferruginous Pygmy Owl

Ferruginous pygmy owl

You may have to travel a long way to see this species. Inge saw it in south Texas, at the northern limit of its range.

A tiny owl with a longish tail, it is no bigger than an Eastern Bluebird. A daytime hunter, its wingbeats aren’t muffled as it darts from a perch like a flycatcher to catch insects, small reptiles or even birds.

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Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine Falcon

These iconic falcons have slowly re-established in Virginia after their decimation decades ago from pesticides. This pair of young adults considered nesting under the Chickahominy river bridge, close to the James River. Inge suspects that too much human attention frightened them off. Hopefully, they found a more secluded location to breed.

Despite much persecution in the past, Peregrine Falcons find human constructions make fine nesting places. In the breeding season you can watch a pair raising chicks via a camera link on the top of a high rise building in downtown Richmond, VA.